To build jQuery, you need to have the latest Node.js/npm and git 1.7 or later. Earlier versions might work, but are not supported. For Windows, you have to download and install git and Node.js. OS X users should install Homebrew. Once Homebrew is installed, run brew install git to install git, and brew install node to install Node.js. Linux/BSD users should use their appropriate package managers to install git and Node.js, or build from source if you swing that way. Easy-peasy. Special builds can be created that exclude subsets of jQuery functionality. This allows for smaller custom builds when the builder is certain that those parts of jQuery are not being used. For example, an app that only used JSONP for $.ajax() and did not need to calculate offsets or positions of elements could exclude the offset and ajax/xhr modules. Any module may be excluded except for core, and selector. To exclude a module, pass its path relative to the src folder (without the .js extension). Some example modules that can be excluded are: <--bit-->

irvas.netirvas.net

-

wpdiy.netwpdiy.net

-

tiwgp.comtiwgp.com

-

shiask.liveshiask.live

-

smppoker.cosmppoker.co

-

jetlac.dejetlac.de

-

emzirmeatleti.comemzirmeatleti.com

-

auntnana.comauntnana.com

-

661789.info661789.info

-

sinayy.comsinayy.com

<--ti--> Note: Excluding Sizzle will also exclude all jQuery selector extensions (such as effects/animatedSelector and css/hiddenVisibleSelectors). The build process shows a message for each dependent module it excludes or includes. As an option, you can set the module name for jQuery's AMD definition. By default, it is set to "jquery", which plays nicely with plugins and third-party libraries, but there may be cases where you'd like to change this. Simply set the "amd" option: For questions or requests regarding custom builds, please start a thread on the Developing jQuery Core section of the forum. Due to the combinatorics and custom nature of these builds, they are not regularly tested in jQuery's unit test process. The non-Sizzle selector engine currently does not pass unit tests because it is missing too much essential functionality.

II) 3) La réalisation

Pour débuter notre travail, nous avons étudié le signal reçu, grâce au module de réception DCF77. Notre but était de voir l’allure du signal reçu. Nous avons donc tout d’abord étudié ce montage, qui est une forme plus réduite de ce que nous utiliserons à la fin :

1er Montage radio

À droite, on peut voir l’antenne. Nous étudions d’abord en détail le signal reçu, avant qu’il soit traité par le microprocesseur. Pour l’étudier, nous avons branché un oscilloscope au montage ci-dessus. Voilà ce que nous avons obtenu :

photo 1(5)

Pour plus d’informations sur le signal reçu, voir « le signal radio ». Ces informations seront également étudiées plus tard dans la démarche.

Ce signal est porteur d’une information codée. Pour la décoder, et l’afficher sur un écran, nous avons branché le module Arduino ainsi :

Schema_cablage_arduino

Nous avons ainsi obtenu ce montage :

photo 3(3)

Nous détaillerons plus loin le décodage de l’information. Pour plus d’information, voir « Le décodage »

Le programme, vendu avec le module Arduino, a permis, une fois transféré sur le microprocesseur, de n’avoir qu’à brancher l’écran pour y afficher l’heure. La première vidéo ci-dessous montre le moment où l’heure est interprétée, et la deuxième montre une initialisation totale :

photo 4(3)

Cet écran nous a permis d’étudier la mise à l’heure de la montre. L’initialisation est observable ici :

 

 

Page Suivante

Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse de messagerie ne sera pas publiée.